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Corruption in Spain

Discussion in 'Rant and Rave' started by walesrob, Oct 28, 2013.

  1. walesrob
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    walesrob Administrator Staff Member

    Just come back from a short break in sunny Spain, and I can see how the Philippines has inherited corrupt practices from it's former colonial master Spain.

    As I found out, selling a car in Spain is vastly complicated. Of course, not being able to speak Spanish, we had to get a solicitor to do everything for us. First, you fill in some forms, get a solicitor to check them over, and then wait at least 2-3 weeks. Why wait that long? The documentation has to be presented in person at the office in Alicante (called Traffico), and our solicitor told us, and I quote, 'its 44km away, so we wait until they have at least 2 or 3 they can process at once'. So we may have to wait longer than 3 weeks, depending whether the solicitor in can be bothered to make that 44km journey, and the buyer has to wait, and pay the 335Euros fee. :erm:

    While I was over there, I read many horror stories of Brit expats getting ripped off - example, a British guy had his Spanish registered Range Rover impounded by the Policia, but when he went to pay the fine and pick up the vehicle, he was told they don't know where it is. They lost it they claimed?! A few days later, he saw his Range Rover being used as a patrol car by the local police. He took some pictures of the the newly decorated Range Rover and complained to the Mayor, who promptly told him, tough, you ain't getting it back.

    Another story doing the rounds in the local papers over there is of a Brit couple who had bought a villa 10 years ago, and paid the purchase price outright. Then earlier this year, they were given 30 days to get out. Turned out the builder had mortgaged the villa totally unknown to the couple, and when the builder failed to keep up with the payments, the bank came knocking. They were kicked out 2 weeks ago, no one in the local government would help them, no one in the courts could do a thing, as the builder had simply gone bankrupt and was carrying on as a new business. This has happened a few times it seems, each time, the unsuspecting owners been given marching orders.

    In Murcia, another retired couple had half their garden taken away from them for a new urbanisation to be built, and the builders are apparently allowed to charge the couple 44K for the privilege. It's being contested in the courts, but still, it seems expats are easy game for corrupt Spanish officials.
  2. subseastu
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    subseastu I'm Bruce Wayne Lifetime Member

    Excellant post Rob. I must admit we're thinking of moving to southern Spain after our return from the Philippines but its stories like this that make you think twice. I wonder how common this sort of thing is as I work with a lot of guys who live in Spain and have done for years with little or no problems. Its probably like a lot of places and just a matter of doing the research, obviously made a lot easier these days with the internet.
  3. KeithAngel
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    KeithAngel 2063 Lifetime Member

    thats because

    A) your paying 4% of the book value of the car plus 40 euros I hope you wrote the date of sale on the transfer part as the new owner then only has 10 days to put it into their name and its a good idea to check with the local office that it has been reregisered other wise you will remain responcible for any fines etc
  4. johncar54
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    johncar54 Member

    I agree corruption exists in Spain but it does too in UK and most other countries to some extent..

    It may be that as I have lived in Spain 25 years and speak reasonable Spanish, that in the main, I do not recognise the complaints being made. Several of the points mentioned are not as depicted.

    Selling a car for example does not need the intervention of a solicitor and one does not need to go in person to Trafico. However, if one does not speak the language they may need help for that reason, as they would in any country.

    The case of the Range Rover, a complaint to the Guardia Civil or National Police would have resolved the matter immediately.

    In UK if you buy something which has a debt on it, it can be returned to person who 'owns' the debt, e.g. a Finance Company.

    The land matter in Murcia. That is the law, not corruption. When one buys a property one needs to make themselves aware of what they are committing themselves to. I am thinking of buying a property in Philippines, I am checking what that may mean before I part with my cash. If I don't like what I find I won't buy, if I do I will not cry if later I discover something untoward which I should have researched.

    Suseastu, I live in Southern Spain, its a great place to live. Do your research and come to Spain.
  5. JohnAsh
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    JohnAsh No longer a member

    It certainly is a great place.
  6. walesrob
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    walesrob Administrator Staff Member

    Did you actually read the story in the Costa Blanca News? If you had, you would have learned the guy who owned the vehicle is still waiting for a resolution many years later.

    I think you'll find there is far more corruption in Spain then here in the UK, but then maybe spending 25 years over there has somewhat given you a rose-tinted view of your adopted country.
  7. johncar54
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    johncar54 Member

    I think you'll find there is far more corruption in Spain then here in the UK, but then maybe spending 25 years over there has somewhat given you a rose-tinted view of your adopted country.

    Yes you may be right, or maybe after living here so long, I know a little better than someone who spent 'a short break' here, how it really is.

    And PS, I never believe wholeheartedly, stories in newspaper, which as we all know, are written to sell newspapers, not depict the truth.
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  8. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday Active Member

    My friend's mother-in-law, a Spanish citizen invested in savings with Santander Bank in Spain. The money disappeared, and there is a court case to get it back -since many elderly people invested, many of them will be dead by the time the verdict is head.
  9. Mattecube
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    Mattecube I have no need Trusted Member

    Larry are you aware the last response prior to yours was 5 years ago!
  10. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday Active Member

    Yes I was and still relevant today;)
  11. Mattecube
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    Mattecube I have no need Trusted Member

    But have they had the verdict?
  12. CatchFriday
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    CatchFriday Active Member

    Probably it may take them 10 years plus to get a verdict.

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