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Chicken adobo

Discussion in 'Recipes and Ideas' started by Tam K, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. Bootsonground
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    Bootsonground Well-Known Member

    I`m not convinced.
    They buy the very best quality rice and then they serve it with ...this!!
    To me,it looks like someone threw up a BigMac.

    [​IMG]
  2. Dave_E
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    Dave_E Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Here is a nice picture from an article in Philstar

    [​IMG]

    How does the rice on sale differ?
    Would a wealthy family always buy the most expensive rice, or is the best rice not always the most expensive?
  3. oss
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    oss Tech Guy Staff Member

    I think some are mixed, when she was short and had to buy some rice locally at a store like that (smaller) she would go with the Dinorado, but if Jasmine was available she would choose that.

    I think a lot of these varieties represent rice grown in different regions, people like glutinous rice i.e. sticky rice, and I think the degree of stickiness and fragrance varies between the various varieties.

    Interestingly Indian Basmati is very fragrant too, I know when it is ready by the smell, it is just nowhere near as sticky as the other Asian varieties.

    I don't think I've ever tried the most expensive one in that picture.

    When I first went there rice was in the region of 16 to 20 peso/kg, they have suffered huge inflation in rice prices in the last 10 years.
  4. Dave_E
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    Dave_E Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Looking at the expensive rice at the front of the photo "Pure Malagkit", that is Sticky Rice.

    From Wikipedia: Glutinous Rice

    Filipino
    In the Philippines, glutinous rice is known as malagkit (literally "sticky" in Tagalog, cognate to Malay melekit); milled glutinous rice is known as galapong. Milling, that is, washing and soaking the rice first, and then proceeding to milling, is generally preferred. This removes the powdery texture found in glutinous rice that has been dried first and milled as flour.

    Glutinous rice cooked in coconut or banana leaf wrappers are steamed to produce suman, of which there are many varieties depending on the region. Some of the common toppings are bukayo, grated mature coconut cooked in sugar; coconut jam; and freshly grated coconut. Some regions eat suman as a snack with ripe mangoes or bananas. In suman sa lihiya (lye), the rice grains are treated with a solution of lye and dried. The grains are put into a banana leaf cone or coconut leaf wrapper and steamed. The rice may be mixed with sugar, coconut milk, or other grains such as millet. Malagkit is also used in puto, or steamed rice cakes, of which numerous variations exist.
    (continued in Wikipedia...)

    Last edited: Jan 20, 2017
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. Bootsonground
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    Bootsonground Well-Known Member

    You buy glutinous rice separately and then mix it with normal rice.. The amount added depends how sticky you want it!!
    If you look at expensive rice..Say 50 per Kilo and then another brand for 40 a kilo the difference is usually pretty clear.. At least to me..
    In the UK we used to buy expensive brand Thai rice..Only broken.. Half price back then!!
  6. Bootsonground
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    Bootsonground Well-Known Member

    Wealthy people are often Kuripot..Thats why they are wealthy.. Tight gits probably buy 30.00 NFA!!
  7. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member


    that was cruel and unkind, uncalled for. i'm offended.
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  8. Timmers
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    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Jim, please stop trying to read between the lines I write, if my memory serves me right we have been down this road before and its making us look like idiots in front of our Filipino friends.

    Leave it for the political threads...................please :) oh should I have put that smiley at the end, is it in keeping with the post, of course it is :)
  9. Timmers
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    Timmers Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    That made me want to puke when I opened the picture up, doesn't look very appetising to me :)
  10. Bootsonground
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    Bootsonground Well-Known Member

  11. Bootsonground
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    Bootsonground Well-Known Member


    It`s a pork blood stew... If you think about it,the ingredients are not far off what you need to make a black pudding.
    Just saw the pic again....Making me hungry.
  12. bigmac
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    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    my wife immedeiately recognised--and named the dish--even before the caption came up.
  13. tipipay
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    tipipay Active Member

    Hi @joi1991, we've tried cooking the Basmati rice last night. We'll it's really a bit different (than what I used to have) and takes a while to cook than our usual rice in Pinas. I'll try looking for an Asian shop here and get a Thai Jasmine. :eek::eek::eek:
  14. tipipay
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    tipipay Active Member

    Rice varies in some aspects like color, texture, "taste", aroma when cooked and price if affordable or not. This is why some people have different preferences when it comes to rice in the Philippines.

    And to answer your question, the best tasting rice don't need to be expensive. Depends on where your buy it and the variety.

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