1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

You Heard it Here First ....

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by JohnAsh, Mar 4, 2021.

  1. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Boris Johnson outlines his plans for a healthier Britain.

    • Like Like x 2
  2. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    This pandemic has rocked peoples' worlds.
    Many people are now really self-evaluating their lifestyles.
    I have joined an NHS scheme "Healthier You" which should prevent T2D.
    It is a course done online via Microsoft Teams.
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Druk1
    Offline

    Druk1 Well-Known Member

    I currently walk 17-20 Km a day, good fresh air, and virtually walking the appalachian trail without the dangers of inbred hillbilly, rattlesnakes, or black bears (though I don't actually mind any of those).
  4. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Your Team meetings should be interesting. At the moment it’s a postcode lottery as to what advice one receives. If you are lucky and have the right practioners at your disposal they will advise you to avoid or minimise starchy carbs. If you are unlucky you will be encouraged to eat starchy carbs which is an act of lunacy if you are at all T2 diabetic, Prediabetic or insulin resistant as starchy carbs = glucose and that would be like encouraging someone with a peanut allergy to eat peanuts.

    You are right. The pandemic has rocked the world. It is only now that this government appears to be getting down to the business of sorting out the NHS and how the NHS deals with metabolic ill health. It’s better late than never. Both Boris and Matt Hancock are low carb advocates. The NHS is about to be run by government. You may have seen the changes announced recently. At last, this will mean the food we eat will be at the forefront of the governments focus on the nations health. It will also save the country a LOT of spondoolics.
    • Like Like x 1
  5. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Thanks, John.
    I recently moved house and some of my stuff is not with me at present because of the pandemic (long story :confused:).
    One thing that I don't have now but will retrieve soon is the " The 21-Day Immunity Plan" book. :cry:

    Then it is full steam ahead.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    From Google when I searched "starchy carbs":
    You should avoid the following foods due to their high starch content:
    • Pasta. A cup of cooked spaghetti has 43 grams (g) of carbohydrates, 36 of which come from starch. ...
    • Potatoes. A single, medium-sized potato has about 31 g of starch. ...
    • White Bread. ...
    • White Rice. ...
    • Corn.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I eat all of those a lot but not much corn.......

    The full steam ahead is going to be tough, but necessary :eek:

    BTW the people I knew in the North West always said "spondoolies".
    It is interesting how different towns even in the same area use words ;)
    Wiki:
    "Spondulix is 19th-century slang for money or cash, more specifically a reasonable amount of spending money. Spondulicks, spondoolicks, spondulacks, spondulics, and spondoolics are alternative spellings, and spondoolies is a modern variant".
    • Like Like x 1
  6. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

  7. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    New Scientist stopped being owned by Reed Business Publishing some time ago, I was sad to see that.

    And F*CK me :( just found that news, that is terrible, really sad to see that happen :(

    I've been buying that publication since 1972 when it was a proper journal, the bumf about it having a growing readership is just that, I would bet the readership has been shrinking for years.

    I'm on a quarterly subscription, I will be monitoring very carefully for signs of impartiality, it was a proper News magazine giving you all sides, it would publish junk sometimes but would always be fair, it published some Uri Geller stuff way back in the 1970s but later published very detailed rebuttals, just a proper impartial News source.

    The ads had already become poisoned on the main web page after Reed sold it off I hate to think what it will look like after an outlet like the Mail gets its hands on it.
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2021
  8. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    "Mrs x sets pulses racing wearing a skimpy pink bikini on her new getaway to the sun"......:eek:
  9. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    Exactly.

    They already have pages on the site where the links are sponsored and they generally lead to that kind of garbage, that would not have happened in the Reed Business Publishing days, I think Reed let it go reluctantly due to falling circulation of the print copy, the people who bought it tried to rejuvenate it with a lot of podcasts, special paid events and special single subject editions (expensive) and all the crappy advertising.

    The Daily Mail and its ilk are so full of adverts that you can't tell what the news stories are and I cannot help but feel that in order to maximise the return on investment that philosophy will spill over to NS, £70 million for a magazine that makes £7 million profit per annum suggests a purchase which they will exploit to increase ROI and then punt on the revised business at a later date, proper Science journalism will be the casualty.

    When I first read NS it was a real hard fact journal, it had a lighter side with Bill Tidy drawing the Grimbledon Down strip and David Jones's Daedalus column both of which were wonderful and hilarious David Jones moved on to Nature about 20 odd years ago but I never laughed so much as at some of his writings on the inside back cover final page of NS, it's changed a lot from those days and not for the better but it was at least still a fairly reliable source, not sure it will be in future.
  10. Jim
    Offline

    Jim Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    Took my car in for maintenance, so I had to do a lot of walking about in the hot sun and humidity. I felt great not even broke into a sweat. Before I went on the keto diet I would lag and feel tired and sweat a lot, even in the house which is 30 c I feel cool.
    Fat is falling off me, not necessary in the right places, my arms, legs, waist and bottom are getting thinner. My belly fat is still there although a little less, I think.
    Wife says I look great, wonder what's shes after.
    • Like Like x 2
  11. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    I think the belly fat is the last to go.

    Dr David Unwin has noted from his patients that belly fat does go.
    • Like Like x 1
  12. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Tom Watson’s tweeted response:

    C3D2B0F3-F50F-4AE0-8AAA-7D486A2FC097.jpeg
  13. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    It seems to be a government thing. The MP for Somerset and Frome, David Warburton.

    'I don't eat so many carbs, I don't eat as much food as I use to. I've swapped beer for gin and turns out gin is quite good, you have to have a treat to look forward - I love a slimline!


    461673BD-B207-4609-9F78-FF7FB4D60DBF.jpeg
    • Winner Winner x 2
  14. Druk1
    Offline

    Druk1 Well-Known Member

    That's a transformation :eek:
  15. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Looks like two different men :eek:
  16. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Exactly. Incredible transformation.

Share This Page