1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Coronavirus in the UK

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by aposhark, Mar 4, 2020.

  1. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    I have noticed this in the supermarkets too.
  2. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Thanks very much for your usual detailed replies, Jim.
    • Like Like x 1
  3. aposhark
    Offline

    aposhark Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    I did see this on Amazon:



    Works out at £3.95 each on "Prime".
  4. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    When the removal of restrictions happened back on July 19th I noticed a completely carefree attitude on the part of everyone only a few older people kept wearing masks but as the weeks have rolled on more and more people are wearing better quality masks, but still very few young people.
  5. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    They look alright, the BLS ones I buy are Italian manufactured so also EU.

    I must say that the connection point for the ear loops on that one looks good Mike, they look like they would be less prone to failure.

    The seal is probably not as good as my BLS ones though, this is a picture of the face seal on the BLS.

    [​IMG]
    • Like Like x 2
  6. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    And completely the converse to potential benefit. I saw an elderly (late 70s) near neighbour arriving home from a shopping trip a couple of days ago, complete with mask even to her front door. Very few are wearing them, further down the age range except shop assistants.

    I find myself putting on a mask out of habit but when I realise I am the only one wearing one I take it off.

    The whole mask thing has been a joke. As I mentioned before, many people working in close proximity to one another prior to 19th July, have tended to just wear them on the chin or under the nose. No point of course but from my viewpoint it has been prevalent.
  7. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    Very few shop assistants are wearing one here.

    If you are wearing a surgical mask or a cloth I agree there is little point now, if you are wearing an FFP3 mask in any indoor environment it is a different matter you are protecting yourself.

    Wearing masks outside makes little sense unless you are in a tight crowd.

    We tend to have an innate cognitive bias when we see some people wearing masks improperly, as you say just over the mouth or on their chin, I see that too and it drives me nuts but the majority who are still wearing masks are wearing them correctly, I've deliberately tried to count instances of lazy behaviour like that when I am out and also to count the people who are doing it right.
  8. bigmac
    Offline

    bigmac Well-Known Member Trusted Member

    most people here wear masks in tescos--staff and customers.
    • Like Like x 1
  9. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    As I suspected, there is inevitably going to be a need for a booster sooner or later. And no doubt it may be a requirement for travelling overseas.
  10. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    I meant to say I see so few masks being worn, but anything of this calibre is a rarity.
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2021
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    @oss

    Just booked a flu jab for myself and Mrs Ash over the internet. With Boots the chemist. 25th September. It seems the pharmacies are doing them as usual.
  12. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    The local Pharmacy here at my GP's building does walk in no appointment but what I don't know is if they will have supplies next week, I would like to get it as soon as possible.
  13. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    It's a shame, they are expensive certainly compared to cloth masks and paper surgical masks, and obviously an awful lot of people will be finding purchase of masks to be a major financial stress at this time, I'm privileged to be able to afford these.

    This kind of mask has very little breathing resistance they are still uncomfortable but not seriously so and surgical masks are certainly much more comfortable, the one thing that really discomforts me with any mask is fogging of my glasses when I am wearing them, even the dispersal pattern from the valve on these BLS things ends up passing some moist air over my glasses resulting in fogging and that's a pain.

    I was in a meeting late this afternoon and once again they had only opened one window in the room, I opened the rest, the door to rest of the floor was open so the single open window was not really ventilating that single room, my CO2 meter read 680 parts per million after I closed the door and took about 15 minutes to drop to 450 ppm but never reached outside air quality of 413 ppm today even after 45 minutes so I was stuck in the mask for the entire meeting and that was not fun.

    Had there only been two of us I would possibly have taken it off at 413 ppm and taken the chance but there were four in the room and two of them had recently been on holiday in Cornwall where there was a bit of a super-spreader recently, it's depressing, I would like to get back to normal but I don't think I am going to feel much safer until after a flu vaccine and later the third shot booster for Covid which I am hoping for us oldies will be Pfizer or Moderna or maybe the Novavax one, basically anything that is not based on the adenovirus used in the AZ vaccine.

    The Russian Sputnik vaccine is very similar tech to the AZ but their second dose is based on a different viral vector and that seems to have improved the overall efficacy of their vaccine it is up there with Pfizer and Moderna in immediate efficacy so the thinking is that a a different type of vaccine for a booster compared to your first two shots is likely to be the best option.
  14. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    I am fishing around now on the ideal / recommended time delay between flu jab and booster.
  15. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    A month was what I was reading last year but if what you were saying about them wanting to give the flu and covid together now is true then they seem to have ditched that idea, it's another reason I want to get the flu injection over and done with quickly so that I will be ready for the Covid booster if it arrives.
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2021
  16. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Me too.
  17. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    It’s looking like we all might end up being infected, the way things are going. If so each and every immune system across the land is going to be rigorously tested. Survival of the fittest.
  18. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    Vax immunity is short lived. See Israel data. Making that very clear. Should we not be telling people to have vitamin c, d3 and zinc and also work on better metabolic health? Those in ICU with covid are mainly obese - need a push in weight loss but didly squat.
  19. oss
    Offline

    oss Somewhere Staff Member

    Antibody levels are short lived yes, that is what the Israeli data is showing, however T and B cell memory is another matter that seems to be holding up well which is why they keep saying 'protects well against hospitalisation and death'.

    Israeli data is still showing that the majority of hospitalised vaccinated people with delta are older and have comorbidities.

    I admit I was over alarmist a month ago with predications of 300 to 400 thousand infections per day in the UK by now, however to some extent I think it's the schools being off that has delayed that, Scotland is showing an alarming increase in infections since the schools went back. The Covid Symptom Study (ZOE) is still showing that case numbers in the UK are in the 50,000 to 60,000 a day range just now, they are estimating based on reporting through their app and have consistently predicted higher numbers than the official government web site.

    Also just looking at the official numbers that I screen grab every day and looking back to hospital admissions 28 days ago then checking how many people are dying now, large numbers of people are still dying, if you are in hospital with Covid you have on average a 1 in 5 chance of dying obviously that might be biased towards older age groups but overall that is the result 28 days later (a very crude analysis on my part I admit).

    What really matters is whether over the next few months this level of deaths remains constant as that would indicate that the T and B cell response is holding up.

    Totally agree on the Vitamin C & D3 and weight, add barrier protection to the list to reduce overall viral load though.

    My kit.
    [​IMG]

    The problem with breakthrough infections is that it could be a simple case of the sheer size of infection and constantly breathing in virus from others overwhelms the antibody response you are able to mount.

    Once SARS-CoV-2 has a foothold its rate of replication and means of replication are what is doing the damage, the SARS-CoV-2 genome codes for 29 proteins, the spike protein is just one of those, the one that appears to do the damage is nsp1 non structural protein 1 (lots of viruses have an nsp1 this refers to Covid's) which moderates the replication process when it hijacks cell replication machinery, apparently it affects the expression of about 9000 genes in the host cell, the alterations appear to enhance viral replication but suppress normal protein manufacture function of the host cell, this is what kills the host cell as ultimately it can't do its job.

    There are several references to this out there this is one but not the original article I read on this Nonstructural Protein 1 of SARS-CoV-2 Is a Potent Pathogenicity Factor Redirecting Host Protein Synthesis Machinery toward Viral RNA - PubMed (nih.gov)
  20. JohnAsh
    Offline

    JohnAsh Well-Known Member Lifetime Member

    INEOS. We had the owners son on our programme, the owner being the wealthiest chap in the U.K. The name is everywhere these days. And a new version of the Landrover too.

    As we have found out over the last couple of years now, time will tell. Until then, Eat Real Food, protect the NHS, Save Lives.

Share This Page